Wednesday, October 22, 2014

History Trivia - fire destroys the temple of Apollo at Daphne

October 22

 362 A mysterious fire destroyed the temple of Apollo at Daphne outside Antioch.

741 King Charles Martel, the grandfather of the great emperor Charlemagne, died at age 53.

1303 Benedict XI was elected Pope. The brief pontificate of Benedict was dominated by difficulties with King Philip IV the Fair of France.


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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

History Trivia - Henry VIII of England named Defender of the Faith

October 21,

1096 The People's Crusade (part of the First Crusade also known as the Peasants' Crusade or the Paupers' Crusade), led by Peter the Hermit, was slaughtered by Seljuk Turks at the Battle of Civetot. 

1422 When Henry VI was eight months old he succeeded to the English throne, and shortly afterwards, by the death in 1422 of his maternal grandfather, Charles VI, he became titular king of France.

 1449 George, Duke of Clarence, brother of Edward IV and Richard III was born.

1529 The Pope named Henry VIII of England Defender of the Faith after he defended the seven sacraments against Luther.

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Monday, October 20, 2014

King Tut Re-Creation Presents a Shocking Image

by Rossella Lorenzi
A virtual reconstruction depicts King Tut at the time of death.

Tutankhamun’s beautiful golden mask, the embodiment of a man secure in his power, has been flattering the pharaoh for many centuries, according to the most detailed image yet of the teenage king’s face and body.
In the flesh, King Tut had a club foot, a pronounced overbite and girlish hips, says a “virtual autopsy” built using more than 2,000 computerized tomography (CT) scans of the pharaoh’s body.
Built for the BBC documentary, “Tutankhamun: the Truth Uncovered,” the shocking 3-D computer model could shed new light on the death of the boy pharaoh at the age of 19.
King Tut Felled by Malaria, Bone Disease
Previous theories suggested King Tut may have died as a result of a chariot accident, but the virtual reconstruction showed a different scenario.
“It was important to look at his ability to ride on a chariot and we concluded it would not be possible for him, especially with his partially clubbed foot, as he was unable to stand unaided,” Albert Zink, head of the Institute for Mummies and Icemen in Italy, told the U.K. daily The Independent.
According to Ashraf Selim, an Egyptian radiologist, King Tut “also developed Kohler’s disease or death of the bones, during adolescence, which would have been incredibly painful.”
King Tut Wore Orthopedic Sandals
Indeed, about 130 walking sticks found in King Tut’s treasure-packed tomb would support the theory that the boy pharaoh had to rely on canes to get around.
Zink believes the pharaoh’s early death was most likely caused from his weakened state — a result of genetic impairments inherited from his parents, who were siblings.
Indeed, in 2010 an international genetic study produced a five-generation pedigree of Tutankhamun’s immediate lineage. In the study, the mummy known as KV55 — most likely the “heretic” Akhenaten — and KV35YL, also known as the Younger Lady, were identified as siblings, as well as King Tut’s parents.
King Tut Death by Chariot? Not So Fast
The study confirmed the frail king was afflicted by malaria and suffered a badly broken leg, above his knee, just before he died.
“It is difficult to say whether malaria may have been a serious factor in the cause of death,” Zink said.
The boy pharaoh has been puzzling scientists ever since his mummy and treasure-packed tomb were discovered on Nov. 22, 1922, in the Valley of the Kings by British archaeologist Howard Carter.
Weird Facts About King Tut and His Mummy
Only a few facts about his life are known. Tut.ankh.Amun, “the living image of Amun,” ascended the throne in 1332 B.C., at the age of 9, and reigned until his death at 19.
As the last male in the family, his death ended the 18th dynasty — probably the greatest of the Egyptian royal families — and gave way to military rulers.
Discovery News

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Prehistoric Temple Uncovered in Ukraine

by Owen Jarus

A temple dating back about 6,000 years has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine. Inside the temple, archaeologists found humanlike figurines, sacrificed animal remains and potter fragments. Here's a look at the prehistoric finding. [Read full story on the prehistoric temple discovery]
Prehistoric temple

A temple dating back about 6,000 years has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine.
The temple measures 60 by 20 meters (197 by 66 feet) and was made of wood and clay. Originally two stories tall it was surrounded by a galleried courtyard. The temple and settlement were burned down after they were abandoned. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)


Clay altars
Inside the 6,000-year-old temple in the Ukraine archaeologists found the remains of eight clay platforms that likely served as altars.
Inside the temple archaeologists found the remains of eight clay platforms that likely served as altars. One of them is pictured here. "Numerous burnt bones of lamb, associated with sacrifice" were found in one of these platforms in the temple's upper floor, write Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko, of the Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Sacrificial remains
An altar found inside a 6,000-year-old temple in the Ukraine contained burnt animal bones, possibly the remains of a sacrifice.
This platform contains burnt animal bones, possibly the remains of a sacrifice. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Pottery fragments
Inside a room of the prehistoric temple in the Ukraine archaeologists found contained a large pot and several smaller vessels.
The upper floor of the Ukraine temple was divided into five rooms. One of these rooms, on the south side of the temple, contained a large pot and several smaller vessels. A picture of it is seen here. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Human figurines
Inside the prehistoric temple in the Ukraine archaeologists discovered humanlike figurines.
While excavating the temple, which was first detected in 2009 and only recently surveyed, archaeologists found a number of figurine fragments, some of them in a humanlike shape. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Wonky eyes
The figurines found inside the Ukraine temple have eyes that are dissimilar, one being larger than the other. They also have noses that look a bit like a beak.
These figurine fragments have eyes that are dissimilar, one being larger than the other. They also have noses that look a bit like a beak. Similar figurines, also dating back around 6,000 years, have been discovered at other sites in Ukraine, referred to as belonging to the Trypillia culture. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Hair decoration
These tiny gold pendants, less than an inch in size, were also discovered at the temple in the Ukraine.
These tiny gold pendants, less than an inch in size, were also discovered at the temple, which would have sprawled some 238 hectares (588 acres), according to recent geomagnetic surveys. The pendants may have been worn on someone's hair. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
Game tokens
Archaeologists also found a variety of clay tokens inside the temple.
Archaeologists also found a variety of clay tokens inside the temple. Artifacts like these were used for counting and game playing in the ancient world. (Photo Credit: courtesy Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko/Institute of Archaeology NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv.)
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History Trivia - The Greeks defeated the Persians at Salamis

October 20

480 BC The Greeks defeated the Persians in a naval battle at Salamis, an island in the Saronic Gulf near Athens. It marked the high-point of the second Persian invasion of Greece which had begun in 480 BC.

1097 First Crusaders arrived in Antioch. The first siege, by the crusaders against the Muslim city, lasted from October 21, 1097, to June 2, 1098.

1524 Thomas Linacre, physician and classical scholar, who founded the Royal College of Physicians in London died.

1632 Christopher Wren, astronomer/great architect (St. Paul's Cathedral), was born.
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Sunday, October 19, 2014

Mr. Chuckles is taking on politics with author E.J. Greenway around The Wizard's Cauldron

The Wizard speaks:

There aren't many political thrillers in Indie and so when I met Emma Gray on my Twitterbus, I was keen to find out what was going on. 

I subsequently found out that Emma actually works at the Palace of Westminster and her novels are drawn from real life. 

This was too exciting an opportunity to pass up and when Emma released her follow up, "Power Games" I got on the Wizphone and asked her to answer a few questions for me. 

Emma's Question Time, as it were.

Though incredibly busy, she was happy to oblige and I caught up with her in one of the many cloisters that line the corridors of power in the Origin of Democracy. 

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History Trivia - Romans under Scipio Africanus defeats Hannibal's army in the Battle of Sama

October 19

202 BC, the Romans under Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal's army of Carthaginians and Numidians in the Battle of Sama in the Second Punic War.

439 Gaiseric, King of the Vandals, seized the Roman city of Carthage, and made it his capital.

1216 King John of England died at Newark-on-Trent and was succeeded by his nine-year-old son Henry.

1453 The French recapture of Bordeaux brought the Hundred Years' War to a close, with the English retaining only Calais on French soil.

1469 Ferdinand of Aragon married Isabella of Castile creating the alliance that unified Spain. Follow on Bloglovin