Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Available on iTunes - The Briton and the Dane by Mary Ann Bernal, narrated by Sebastian Lockwood

http://www.amazon.com/Briton-Dane-Second-Mary-Bernal-ebook/dp/B00BRPALAQ/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1409596861&sr=8-3&keywords=the+briton+and+the+dane









Written by: Mary Ann Bernal
Narrated by: Sebastian Lockwood
Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins 
 
Unabridged Audiobook
 
King Alfred the Great has thwarted the Viking threat against his kingdom of Wessex. Signing a treaty with the formidable Danish King Guthrum, he succeeds in pushing the heathen army back to the rolling fens of East Anglia.
An uneasy peace holds sway: The King establishes a standing army under Lord Richard, who takes command of the citadel at Wareham.
Richard and his army are accompanied by his daughter, Gwyneth, an impetuous and reckless young woman - at once striking, intellectually gifted, but dangerously vain and imprudent.
While Richard broods on the Viking threat, Gwyneth falls in love with an enemy prince - only to discover that she has been betrothed to a Saxon warrior twice her age.
Refusing to countenance her grim fate, she flees the fortress, but is soon kidnapped by a Viking warrior and taken to the camp of King Guthrum while Saxon search parties scour the land.
In captivity, a hostage to fortune, and the focus of political intrigue, Gwyneth is submerged in a world of expediency, betrayal, and black treachery. Slowly, she realizes the truth is suspect, nothing is what it appears and her reality cannot be trusted.
And all the time, against this background, she desires nothing more than to be reunited with her dashing Danish prince.


iTunes Purchase Link




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History Trivia - Sultan Saladin and King Richard the lion hearted sign a cease fire

 Sept 2

911 Viking-monarch Oleg of Kiev-Russia signed a treaty with Byzantines. 1

192 Sultan Saladin and King Richard the lion hearted signed a cease fire.

1537 Danish King Christian III published an Ordinance on the Danish Church which ordered Denmark to convert to Lutheranism and as Norway was then ruled by Denmark, the Norwegians converted as well.

1666 The Great Fire of London began in a bakery on Pudding Lane and will destroy much of the city.
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Monday, September 1, 2014

Stonehenge: ghostly outlines of missing stones appear

By ,

Archaeologists can now say for certain that Stonehenge was once a complete circle after the dry weather revealed the ghostly outlines of missing stones

It is a mystery which has intrigued archaeologists for centuries: did the huge Neolithic stones which make up Stonehenge form a complete circle?
Now the puzzle has been answered after the dry summer revealed the faint outline of the missing megaliths.
Usually the ground is watered by stewards, to keep the earth moist and the grass healthy.
But this year, the hose they used was too short to reach the whole site. By chance, the incomplete section of the inner stone circle was left to dry out.
When archaeological features have been buried in the ground for a long time, they affect the rate that grass grows above them, even long after they have disappeared.

In the past heatwaves have picked out the eerie outlines of Roman forts, Iron age earthworks and the remains of stone age monuments.
English Heritage said the find was ‘really significant’ and said if they had bought a longer hosepipe, the marks may never have been spotted.
"A lot of people assume we've excavated the entire site and everything we're ever going to know about the monument is known,” said Susan Greaney, from English Heritage.
"But actually there's quite a lot we still don't know and there's quite a lot that can be discovered just through non-excavation methods.
"It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were.
"We maintain the grass with watering when it's very dry in the summer, but our hosepipe doesn't reach to the other side of the stone circle. If we'd had a longer hosepipe we might not have been able to see them.
“It's really significant, and it shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge.”
Historians have long wondered whether Stonehenge was an intentionally-incomplete circle, but countless high resolution geophysical surveys and excavations have failed to give the answer.
Staff only water the site during the driest weeks of summer, but the hosepipe doesn't reach to the south-west quadrant where there is a gap in the circle.
Worker Tim Daw spotted the patches on the ground - now thought to be 'stone holes' - where the grass was more parched.
He said: "I was standing on the public path looking at the grass near the stones and thinking that we needed to find a longer hosepipe to get the parched patches to green up.
"A sudden light-bulb moment in my head, and I remembered that the marks were where archaeologists had looked without success for signs that there had been stone holes, and that parch marks can signify them.
"I called my colleague over and he saw them and realised their possible significance as well. Not being archaeologists we called in the professionals to evaluate them.
"I am still amazed and very pleased that simply really looking at something, that tens of thousands of people had unwittingly seen, can reveal secrets that sophisticated machinery can't."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/archaeology/11066703/Stonehenge-ghostly-outlines-of-missing-stones-appear.html
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The Briton and the Dane featured on Bargain Books


Ereader News

http://www.amazon.com/Briton-Dane-Second-Mary-Bernal-ebook/dp/B00BRPALAQ/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1409596861&sr=8-3&keywords=the+briton+and+the+dane
 
King Alfred the Great has thwarted the Viking threat against his kingdom of Wessex. Signing a treaty with the formidable Danish King Guthrum, he succeeds in pushing the heathen army back to the rolling fens of East Anglia.

An uneasy peace holds sway: The King establishes a standing army under Lord Richard, who takes command of the citadel at Wareham.

Richard and his army are accompanied by his daughter, Gwyneth, an impetuous and reckless young woman – at once striking, intellectually gifted, but dangerously vain and imprudent.

While Richard broods on the Viking threat, Gwyneth falls in love with an enemy prince - only to discover that she has been betrothed to a Saxon warrior twice her age.

Refusing to countenance her grim fate, she flees the fortress, but is soon kidnapped by a Viking warrior and taken to the camp of King Guthrum while Saxon search parties scour the land.

In captivity, a hostage to fortune, and the focus of political intrigue, Gwyneth is submerged in a world of expediency, betrayal and black treachery. Slowly, she realizes the truth is suspect, nothing is what it appears and her reality cannot be trusted.

And all the time, against this background, she desires nothing more than to be reunited with her dashing Danish prince. Follow on Bloglovin

Facebook Event - Book launch Fractured Vows: Brooklyn and Bo Chronicles (Book Three) - September 5, 2014 11-12pm PDT


https://www.facebook.com/events/380878058735532/

Saturday, September 5
11-12:00pm in PDT
 
 

More Brooklyn & Bo Chronicles!

Book three is the first book in the trilogy from a guys perspective. Find out why Brooklyn fell in love with Bo.

...
When love comes with a price...

What happens once a vengeful ex just won’t let go? Bo and Brooklyn’s worlds are turned upside down as they find themselves facing insanity in the form of an angry woman who loses all reason when she tries to destroy them. Will Ruth give up or will she succeed in ending the relationship between her former husband and his new love?

 
 

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History Trivia - Lady Anne Boleyn made Marchioness of Pembroke

Sept 1

 891 Northmen defeated near Louvaine, France.

 1339 The Hundred Years' War officially began when King Edward III of England declared war on France. 

 1532 Lady Anne Boleyn was made Marchioness of Pembroke by her future husband, King Henry VIII of England.


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Sunday, August 31, 2014

Ancient Arabian Stones Hint at How Humans Migrated Out of Africa

By Charles Q. Choi

Ancient Homo Skull
A 1.8-million-year-old skull that was discovered in Dmanisi, Georgia. In a study published in October 2013 in the journal Science, researchers suggested modern humans may have dispersed out of Africa in more than one wave of migration.
Credit: Photo courtesy of Georgian National Museum

Ancient stone artifacts recently excavated from Saudi Arabia possess similarities to items of about the same age in Africa — a discovery that could provide clues to how humans dispersed out of Africa, researchers say.
Follow on Bloglovin Modern humans originated about 200,000 years ago in Africa. However, scientists have long debated when and how the modern human lineage spread out of Africa.
"Understanding how we originated and colonized the world remains one of the most fascinating and enduring questions, because it is our story as humans," said lead study author Eleanor Scerri, an archaeologist at the University of Bordeaux in France.

Previous research had suggested that the exodus from Africa started between 70,000 and 40,000 years ago. However, a genetic analysis reported in April hinted that modern humans might have begun their march across the globe as early as 130,000 years ago, and continued their expansion out of Africa in multiple waves.
In addition, stone artifacts recently unearthed in the Arabian Desert date to at least 100,000 years ago. This could be evidence of an early modern-human exodus out of Africa, scientists say. However, it's possible that these artifacts weren't created by modern humans; a number of now-extinct human lineages existed outside Africa before or at the same time when modern humans migrated there. For instance, the Neanderthals, the closest known extinct relatives of modern humans, lived in both Europe and Asia around that time. [See Images of Our Closest Human Ancestor]
To help shed light on the role the Arabian Peninsula might have played in the history of modern humans, scientists compared stone artifacts recently excavated from three sites in the Jubbah lake basin in northern Saudi Arabia with items from northeast Africa excavated in the 1960s. Both sets of artifacts were 70,000 to 125,000 years old. Back then, the areas that are now the Arabian and Sahara deserts were far more hospitable places to live than they are now, which could have made it easier for modern humans and related lineages to migrate out of Africa.
"Far from being a desert, the Arabian Peninsula between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago was a patchwork of grasslands and savanna environments, featuring extensive river networks running through the interior," Scerri said.
The northeast African stone tools the researchers analyzed were similar to ones previously found near modern-human skeletons. The scientists found that stone artifacts at two of the three Arabian sites were "extremely similar" to the northeast African stone tools, Scerri told Live Science. At the very least, Scerri said, this finding suggests that there was some level of interaction between the groups in Africa and those in the Arabian Peninsula, and might hint that these Arabian tools were made by modern humans.
Surprisingly, Scerri said, tools from the third Arabian site the researchers analyzed were "completely different." "This shows that there was a number of different tool-making traditions in northern Arabia during this time, often in very close proximity to each other," she said.
One possible explanation for these differences is that the artifacts were made by different human lineages. Future research needs to uncover skeletal remains with ancient tools unearthed from the Arabian Peninsula to help solve this mystery, Scerri noted. Unless skeletal remains are found near such artifacts, it will remain uncertain whether modern humans or a different  human lineage might have made them.
"It seems likely that there were multiple dispersals into the Arabian Peninsula from Africa, some possibly very early in the history of Homo sapiens," Scerri said. "It also seems likely that there may have been multiple dispersals into this region from other parts of Eurasia. These features are what make the Arabian Peninsula so interesting."
Ancient migrants out of Africa and from Eurasia might have encountered a number of different populations in the Arabian Peninsula, Scerri said. Some of these groups may have adapted to their environment more than others had, which raises the intriguing question: "Did the exchange of genes and knowledge between such groups contribute to our ultimate success as a species?" Scerri said.
The scientists detailed their findings online Aug. 8 in the Journal of Human Evolution.

http://www.livescience.com/47555-stone-artifacts-human-migration.html